Home » Sublett » Birthdays are a funny thing

Birthdays are a funny thing

 

We take for granted that you will always remember the day your child is born. Today, we have pictures, videos, documents to fill out, stork signs to put in our front yard. This was not always the case. If you are into genealogy, you look for birth records, these are a type of holy grail. It gives us birth information for the child. It also gives us information on the parents. The birth, death and marriage records are considered vital records. Historically states did not keep vital records until the 1900’s. Each state is different and started keeping them at different times. So, as a genealogist, you need to know what year the state in question started keeping track. Prior to vital records, people used the family bible as the place to indicate the vital records for one’s family. However, family bibles did not always last, they got lost, and they went to one family member so you might lose crucial information.

Ancestry.com recently uploaded Virginia Vital records that were previously only available individually at $12.00 a pop. I know, because I have given the state many dollars. So, the other day, I went through my family tree and tried to get these vital records for all of my Virginia ancestors.

I came across one of my great-aunts records. It was a “delayed certificate” as she was born prior to 1912, the year Virginia started recording vital records. I had her recorded as Anne Holmes Sublett. However, the record indicates that her father John Thomas Sublette and her mother Georgia Kate Holt had named her Annie Holmes Sublette (notice the “e”, we will talk about that later). Well, the funny thing is that they must have brought the family bible in with them as it indicates that the bible was published in 1902 and the mother had recorded the birth in the bible as 1908 or 1909, but they were attesting that Annie was born on 7 February 1904. I tend to believe the vital record instead of the bible because in the 1910 census, she is listed clearly as 6 years old. Lacy (my grandfather) was listed as 11/12th (meaning he was 11 months old), and that is accurate information. I do wonder why Annie’s mother got it wrong?

Annie Holmes Sublette

Annie Holmes Sublette

Okay, let’s talk about that “e.” When my ancestors first arrived in the new world their name was Soblet, but at some point the name was changed to be more phonetic, Sublette. My grand-father dropped the “e” at some point because he thought it was uppity.

I met a third cousin while blogging, his family kept the “e.” It is interesting because some of the Soblet descendents that traveled to Kentucky and Texas and beyond also dropped the “e.” I can tell you it does make researching ancestors more challenging when you have to search Soblet, Soblets, Sublet, Sublette, and Sublett to make sure you find everyone.

Annie was a character from what I understand.  Here a couple of pictures of her.  Until later, I will be exploring backwards.

 

Annie Sublette

Annie Sublette

Annie Sublett

Classy Annie Sublette

Unknown friend and Annie Sublette

Unknown friend and Annie Sublette

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